Archive for Schizophrenia

The Power of Christ Compels You

Posted in All, Health, Psychology, Spirituality with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 17, 2010 by marushiadark

“Healing is not a science, but the intuitive art of wooing nature.” ~ W.H. Audin, poet

In my last post, I talked about the basic points of health and healing, stating that the human body is a self-correcting machine and that medicine is only as good as its ability to help the body return to homeostasis.  Most drugs are ineffective in the prevention and curing of disease because they do not address the underlying cause of the problem.  However, there is a field of medicine that I have yet to address and it is perhaps the most powerful form of healing known to man.  It is also the most overlooked and under-appreciated “drug” man has ever created.  I’m talking of course of the Placebo.

A placebo is essentially a form of medicine that has no actual measurable effect on the human body.  The most common form of this is a simple capsule filled with a small amount of sugar.  Its purpose in modern medicine is largely as a control metric in experiments that test the efficacy of drugs.  Patients are given placebos but told they are actually medicine and then the results are compared between the drug being tested and the body’s own ability to heal itself.

I admit, I can’t think of any better way to test the efficacy of drugs than that, but what these tests fail to determine and what modern medicine seems to have completely brushed over, is the actual power of the placebo itself.

A placebo itself has no effect on the body, but the patient believes it does and so their mind registers the belief that it is being healed.  Since the mind controls the body, the state of the mind can affect the health of the body for better or worse.  If the mind is convinced that it is healed or is in the process of being healed, then it will tell the body that everything is okay and so the body will release chemicals and hormones and endorphins to correct whatever issues are there.

Conversely, if the mind believes it is sick or hurt or in pain, then the body will align itself with that belief and act accordingly.  This is the mechanism that creates psychosomatic illness and is a chronic problem in many hypochondriacs.  Very often times, a hypochondriac can become seriously ill from nothing more than the fact that their mind told the body to be sick and it obeyed.

We know that disease is the result of either some overt toxin being present in the body or the lack of sufficient raw materials (water, minerals, etc.) to carry out the bodily functions.  But for all instances where this is not the case, the result is psychosomatic.  It’s all in the mind, meaning that the issue is not with the car, but with its driver.  Correct the driver’s error and the car will stop crashing into trees.

Consequently, this is the mechanism by which all medicine works.  Whatever will convince you that you are better is what will help you heal your body.  This is why drugs can sometimes appear to be helping, even though they are in fact introducing toxic substances into the body.  What’s actually helping is the mind’s orders to release healing chemicals, coupled with the presence of life-enhancing raw materials and energies.  As I said before, the human body is a self-correcting machine.  All you have to do is give it what it needs to do its job and then get out of its way while it does its thing.

“All healing is first a healing of the heart.” ~ Carl Townsend, futurist

The spirit controls the mind, which controls the body.  Everything in the universe is made up of energy, so it would make sense that any and all issues within the higher levels of the body and mind stem from issues on an energy level.  Our conscious minds may not know how all this works, but our subconscious minds and our spirits are working diligently behind the scenes to make sure everything comes alive for us on stage.

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), a diagnosis begins with an assessment of a person’s energy.  In such fields, it is common to hear about things like energy meridians, chakras, yin and yang, feng shui, or the concept of hot-cold-wet-dry.  Such practitioners of TCM have a very acute awareness of the factors that contribute to the health of the energy body – as do a great many faith healers, reikiists, reflexologists, acupuncturists, and psychics – and it is from this assessment of the energy body that they are able to catch and correct most diseases way in advance of western medicine, which still relies mostly on drugs and surgery.

Now, to be fair, there are a great many hacks as well within the alternative community, but the underlying principles are both accurate and applicable, and this is how all of the legitimate ones operate.  And by knowing this, you can begin to heal yourself without help from anyone.

“Then he asked him, ‘What is your name?’ and he answered, saying, ‘My name is Legion; for we are many’.” ~ Mark 5:9

Perhaps the most well-known healer in history is Jesus of Nazareth.  The Gospel of Mark, chapter five, recounts three of Jesus’ more famous healing sessions.

In the Gospel, Jesus is traveling with his disciples by boat when he comes to a small village.  A man from the village is being bound by chains and it is said that even the chains could not hold him for very long.  When Jesus arrives, the man is raving with madness, cutting himself with stones, but falls to his knees at the sight of Jesus and asks that Jesus not torment him.  The man says that he is possessed by a demon that is actually many demons.

In ancient times, people were far more superstitious and didn’t have the modern understanding of psychology that we do today.  So was this a demon or was the man just merely schizophrenic with multiple personality disorder and sadomasochistic tendencies?  Regardless of the actual facts, the man believed he had a demon living inside him and that demon quickly went away when Jesus commanded it to enter into a herd of pigs.  Did Christ really cast out a horde of demons, or did the man simply heal himself with the power of his own mind, for which Jesus was merely a catalyst?

The Gospel states that the demon was known as “the legion” and it affected the man’s “right mind.”  Was this really a demon or was it simply an aberration?  Or perhaps it was even a lesion in the right hemisphere of his brain, which Jesus healed using nothing more than a placebo effect and a transfer of energy.

Regardless of the actual details, the Bible says that when Christ healed the man, the people of the village were very afraid and they made it clear that they didn’t want Jesus hanging around there anymore.  So much for gratitude, eh?  So Jesus got in the boat and sailed back the way he came, but not before the man he healed came up to him and thanked him.  He wanted to go with Jesus, but Christ instead said that he should go and tell the people what he’d done for him.

“And he said to her, ‘Daughter, your faith has made you well.  Go in peace and be healed of your affliction’.” ~ Mark 5:34

By the time Christ reaches shore again, news of his “miraculous” healing powers had reached the people there and he started to gain more attention.  A man named Jarlus came up to him and told him his daughter was sick and near death and he wanted Jesus to come and see her.

Along the way, a crowd begins to follow Jesus.  Among them is a woman with a severe blood disorder.  The Bible says that, for twelve years, she “had suffered many things from many physicians … and was no better, but rather grew worse.”  She hears about Jesus and comes up and touches his cloak because she believes that Jesus has some sort of special healing powers that can save her.

Jesus turns and asks what she thinks she’s doing.  The woman becomes terribly afraid and confesses all, but Jesus tells her not to worry and that she is healed.  Moreover, Jesus emphasizes that it is the woman’s faith that has healed her, not him.

Many Christians today attribute this event as being proof that belief in Christ is what will heal them.  However, it’s less about their faith in Christ and more about the power of the placebo effect and the ability of the mind to heal the body.  What you believe in specifically is of little importance to anyone but yourself.

Many churches, especially televangelist and evangelical churches, are known for their priests and pastors that lay their hands on worshipers and the people feel an overwhelming sensation come over them and they feel much better afterwards.  Scientists can’t explain it or apply it to non-believers and so there is a schism between the scientists who say it’s all bunk and the believers who are exploited into further belief and in subjugating themselves to God and the church.  In actuality, these people are healed because of the power of their own minds over their bodies with the priest or God or whatever merely being a metric that will only work for them and no one else because the minds of others are not geared to believing in that stuff, which is all that matters.

Faith in Christ is just a catalyst for getting the mind to be in a mode of healing and is fundamentally no different than if you were healed through belief in Buddha, Mohammad, or Tom Cruise.  It’s all about you and there’s no subjugation or worship required.

“When he came in, he said to them, ‘Why all this commotion and weep?  The child is not dead, but sleeping’.” ~ Mark 5:39

At the end of Mark 5, a servant comes up to the group and tells Jarlus that his daughter is dead.  Jesus commanded Jarlus not to worry, but to have faith that everything would be alright.  He then went alone with some of his disciples to the house.  Before he even went inside, Jesus told the people there that the child was not dead, but only sleeping.  The people rebuked him for this and so he made them wait outside.

Many Christians believe this to be an example of Jesus bringing someone back from the dead, but is it really?  Why did Jesus say she was only sleeping?

The passage seems to contradict itself here because it says that only Peter, James, and John went with Christ; yet Jarlus, the girl’s father, was present at the house when Jesus got there.  So if Jarlus went, is it possible the servant went as well?  Who really went with him?

If Jarlus and/or the servant went with Christ to the house, they could have told Jesus about her illness and Jesus, being a healer, would have known what the problem was and so he might have known just from that information that it wasn’t anything lethal.  People that aren’t knowledgeable in disease and healing often overreact to what are otherwise relatively simple problems to solve.  Is that what happened here?  I don’t know, but it’s possible.

Or if Jesus went alone with his disciples, he could have relied on his intuition to tell him that the situation wasn’t as bad as it seemed.  I know many times I, myself, have been in what appeared to be very bad situations; but my intuition coached me through it, telling me everything would be alright, and, more often than not, it was.  Is that what happened here?  Again, I don’t know, but it’s possible.

When Jesus got to the house, he made everyone wait outside.  He then took the mother and father and went inside the house to the little girl.  Undoubtedly, they believed that Jesus knew what he was doing and had faith that the little girl would be alright.  Jesus told her to wake up and she did.  Jesus told them to give her something to eat and she was fine from that point on.  Was she really dead or did the servant just mistake her being asleep for actual death?

I remember a very particular scene from the movie Doc Hollywood where Michael J. Fox is about to cut open a kid’s stomach because he believes the boy has a terrible stomach virus; but the local doctor comes by with a cola and gives it to the kid and rebukes Michael J. Fox’s character for nearly putting the boy through an unnecessary and risky procedure.  As it turns out, the boy simply had a case of gas, not a virus at all.  How did the town doctor know?  Because he had treated these people before and knew what they were like and knew their habits and the sorts of things that might cause diseases in that town.  He had knowledge and experience and an understanding that neither the family nor Michael J. Fox’s character had.

Perhaps this twelve-year old girl simply fainted from not having anything to eat.  But let’s consider the possibility that maybe that wasn’t the case, and that maybe there really was something wrong with this girl.  Maybe she wasn’t dead, but instead she just fell into a coma.  How would someone like Jesus have handled that?

Recall that the mother and father probably had a great deal of faith in Christ’s abilities.  They heard stories of how he cured a man of demons and saw how he healed a woman’s illness by the touch of his cloak.  Likely, they and their servants believed him to be some sort of magic man and spiritual healer.  So their minds were aligned with a spirit of healing and so it’s possible they transferred some of that positive energy to the girl and this reached her subconscious and caused her to awake and become healthy again.  After all, everything in the universe is just the interaction of energy waves in space.  All matter and medicine is subject to these laws.

“So based on your time spent with … these bizarre individuals, you’ve concluded that possession is a basic, typical human experience?”

“I must say, counselor, that’s quite a laundry list of disdain and one that thoroughly mischaracterizes my work.” ~ The Exorcism of Emily Rose

The very last line of Mark 5 says that Jesus commanded that no one be told what had happened.  To me, this is more indicative that the actual metric of healing used in this case was the power of faith in the minds of those around him.  If Jesus told them what really happened, perhaps they would lose faith and so then they might also lose the power to heal themselves, having nothing else to believe in and no skills in diagnosing or treating diseases.  And so Jesus would have to be called back to them, which I’m sure he would have preferred not to do if he didn’t have to.

How often have we heard doctors, as we’re leaving their offices and hospitals, tell us, “I don’t ever wanna see you here again” or something comparable?  Of course, that doesn’t mean that they are inherently grouchy and anti-social individuals.  What they mean is that we should take better care of ourselves so that they don’t have to treat us again, because the power to prevent and cure our own maladies and diseases lies in our own hands.

I’m sure some of you reading this article aren’t willing to believe this.  Maybe for you, the catalyst is something else more in line with your empirical beliefs and the scientific method.  Maybe the healer you trust is a medical doctor and because you believe that his remedies work, you become in-tune with the spirit of healing and that helps you get better.

Likewise, I’m sure there are some of you reading this article who are already well-versed in spiritual healing and so I’m just preaching to the choir.

Then there are probably a third class of people that are somewhere in between.  You’re not sure if you believe this works or not.  For those people, if you haven’t read it already, I would recommend the book Clairvoyance and Occult Powers, by Swami Panchadasi.  It’s out of print, but you can find an e-book of it on Google Books.  It was written almost a hundred years ago, and yet it reads as though it were written more recently than that.  I like it because it explains everything in rather layman’s terms from the very beginning and the most basic assumptions that require very little stretching of the imagination.  Another one you may enjoy is simply called Psychic Healing, by Yogi Ramacharaka.  It was written in 1934 and can also be found freely on Google Books.

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D is for Darkness

Posted in All, Media, Psychology with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 13, 2010 by marushiadark

“I like rabbits and all.  They’re cute and they’re horny.  And if you’re cute and you’re horny, then you’re probably happy, in that you don’t know who you are and why you’re even alive.” ~ Donnie Darko

I was watching the movie Donnie Darko earlier today.  It’s an incredibly fucked-up psychological fantasy and I think that may be what makes it one of my favorite movies of all time … that and the fact that I was once not all that dissimilar from Donnie, myself.  The director, Richard Kelly, says he welcomes any and all viewer interpretations as valid and mine is that the movie is a commentary on the way in which a few of us try desperately to escape our conditioned realities.

Donnie Darko is an extremely intelligent and eloquent young high school student who just doesn’t fit in with the world around him.  His principal remarks at one point that his test scores are intimidating, and Donnie constantly challenges those around him to stop buying into the pre-programmed beliefs they’ve been spoon-fed.  But when he tries to break free, the universe pushes back and provides him with nothing but resistance and sorrow and pain.

I think all of us must face this sort of ordeal in life where we question our own existence and come face to face with death and pain and God and the thought of being alone in a cold, dead, and empty nihilistic universe.  For those of us that are more aware, we usually face these issues sooner, rather than later, often around the age that Donnie Darko was in the movie.  For those that are strong enough, we learn to move on and find answers and meaning behind it all.  Like with any test, those that can’t hack it are doomed to repeat their lessons until they ultimately learn them.

So what is it we can learn from Donnie Darko?

“And did you stop and think that maybe infants need darkness?  That maybe darkness is part of their natural environment?” ~ Prof. Kenneth Monnitoff

Perhaps the first thing that Donnie Darko teaches us is that it’s ok to be different (but not easy) and that it’s perfectly normal (but not common) to be going through all of this crap and that life is too boring if you just sit around looking pleasant all the time like Kitty Farmer or Jim Cuttingham.

Darkness teaches us to appreciate the presence of light.  Chaos teaches us to appreciate order.  You can’t have one without the other, since darkness is the absence of light and chaos is the absence of order.  For life to be in dynamic equilibrium, there has to be some of both.  Too much light or too much darkness and you will not be able to see clearly.  Too much light or too much darkness and you’ll eventually go blind.

I remember walking around my school one time when I realized that peace is actually quite boring sometimes and that we never really notice things like peace and love and health until we stop having them; but once we’re sick or in the middle of a war zone or alone, we only want for it to end and for us to return to that healthy and peaceful and loving time.

“There are other things that need to be taken into account here.  Like the whole spectrum of human emotions.  You can’t just lump everything into these two categories and then just deny everything else!” ~ Donnie Darko

Donnie is obviously very aware of reality and that life is a lot more complex than the so-called authorities would have him believe.  Those in positions of power over him live in a fantasy world and use threats and drugs and mind-control techniques when he refuses to conform to their reality.

At one point, Kitty Farmer threatens him, saying that if he won’t put a clearly subjective issue into a black or white category, then he will receive a zero for the day.  Of course, Donnie knows better.  He knows that a failing grade is a meaningless symbol that has no real-world application to anything.  So he tells Kitty that she can shove the whole program up her ass.  This lands him into detention and a parent-teacher meeting is called.  It’s clear from the way in which the principal deals with the situation that he’s little more qualified than Kitty Farmer is – a fact that is further displayed when he fires the only open-minded teacher at the school.

“You’re right, actually …  I’m pretty toubled and I’m pretty confused … but I think you’re the fucking Antichrist.” ~ Donnie Darko

The human mind goes through many different levels of consciousness, ranging from that of a primitive animal all the way up to … well, there’s theoretically no limit to that.

Religion and superstition are just one level along the way.  Religion can be a good thing when it prevents people from causing harm to themselves and to one another and when it gets them to follow a degree of order in their lives.  But those rules are meant more to keep people in line than to reveal to them the truth, and this is when religion can become a problem, as there are many who will kill others because they don’t understand the true purpose of what is written in their religious codices.

“I have reached the end of your book and … there are so many things that I need to ask you.  Sometimes I’m afraid of what you might tell me.  Sometimes I’m afraid that you’ll tell me this is not a work of fiction.” ~ Donnie Darko

Science portends to be all about truth, but it often ignores the equally important vessel of understanding: philosophy.

Donnie Darko’s science teacher, Kenneth Monnitoff, opens up to him initially in explaining to him about time travel and wormholes.  For a while, Donnie is very interested and grateful to his teacher for that guidance.  He takes that knowledge and uses it to advance his understanding of what’s going on; but he becomes frustrated upon returning to his professor again after he’s taken The Philosophy of Time Travel (which Monnitoff gave him) and used it to discover some very esoteric things.  Monnitoff tells him that he can’t continue helping Donnie or he would risk losing his job.  So now Donnie is once again all alone.

I can recall having similar conversations with my own science teachers.  When I started talking about multiple dimensions or the application of negative mass in regards to flying saucers, I got strange and worried looks as though they believed I ought to be in a mental institute.  But was that necessarily the case or did they just not have the imagination or evidence I had?

“I don’t think that you have a clue what it’s like to communicate with these kids.  We are losing them to apathy … to this prescribed nonsense.  They are slipping away.” ~ Karen Pommeroy

Clearly, none of Donnie’s teachers, except for Karen Pommeroy, is even remotely capable of understanding the pain and the trauma that Donnie has gone through.  They aren’t equipped with the awareness and experience necessary to understand that a schizophrenic mind will not conform to social norms.  Whatever Donnie is going through, whether it’s real or imagined, he most certainly believes it to be real and is willing to act upon those beliefs.

For those of you who have never experienced it before, such things as manic-depression, multiple personality disorder, and paranoid schizophrenia arise when the mind is given something that it cannot resolve easily.  It may be a paradox that can’t be logically resolved or a painful experience that the person would rather deny or something that is simply so foreign to everything that the person has come to believe up to that point about reality.  Either way, it’s something so powerful that the mind is incapable of handling it without shutting down, so it partitions itself the way one would partition a hard drive.  This partition is kept separate along with all the related data on the matter until a safe and acceptable resolution can be had.  Medication may curtail the resultant behavior and make the person function within society, but ultimately the only real solution is for the individual to find a way to reunite the two parts of their mind again.

“I hope that when the world comes to an end, I can breath a sigh of relief, because there will be so much to look forward to.” ~ Donnie Darko

Donnie’s principle fear is dying alone.  He tells Dr. Thurman that it’s foolish to believe in God if everyone dies alone.  His therapist explains that he is actually an agnostic, not an atheist, since he acknowledges the possibility of God, even if he’s not sure if there’s proof.

We often talk of God’s plan and divine intervention.  In fact, most of the events in Donnie’s life all happen for a reason.  “Deus Ex Machina,” he cries.  For a more thorough explanation of how any why, see this document.  It’s possible that the events of 2012 may be a similar deal with a Tangent Universe being created that could threaten to destroy the world.  It’s also very reminiscent of some of the themes in Inception and Deja Vu.

At the time of my writing this article, I haven’t seen the sequel to it: S. Darko, but I really would love to.  Maybe I’ll even do a post on that one as well.

In the meantime, I hope that anyone who suffers from a life like the one that Donnie Darko had will be able to make it through alright and come to see it, as I have, as nothing more than a rite of passage into an elect group of aware and free  human beings.

As Gretchin says, being weird is meant as a compliment.