Archive for Reason

One-Month Anniversary

Posted in All, Miscellaneous with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 4, 2010 by marushiadark

“It’s not about me.  It’s not about you, either.  It’s about legacy, the legacy left behind for future generations.” ~ Tony Stark

This post marks the one-month anniversary of The Darkness Files.  I have successfully completed thirty days worth of consecutive posts, and it was anything but easy.

When I started this blog, I told myself I was going to stick to doing one post per day, no more, no less.  At first, I was really excited and gung-ho and I thought I could write three or four posts per day without stopping.  Now I find it’s becoming more difficult to just do one.  On occasion, I’ve found myself squeaking one in before midnight, or publishing it to get the time stamp and then going back and editing it.  I don’t know if that’s, in the strictest sense of the words, integral or ethical or honest, but I do like symmetry and I could think of no better way for me to make sure I had, indeed, done a full set of thirty.

Part of the reason it’s been so difficult for me to come up with material is that I don’t yet have much of an audience to provide me with feedback and encouragement.  Part of it’s also because my intentions for this blog have changed considerably since when I first started it.

At first, I wanted to use this blog as a way of educating the world about the New World Order, beginning from the ground up.  But there are a lot of great speakers and researchers who have done a far better job of that than I ever could, and I felt as though all I’d really be doing is pointing to them and saying, “Hey, here’s some information, go and look at that,” without being able to provide much of my own opinion on the matter.

I wondered if maybe this blog could perhaps serve as a central hub for that sort of information, drawing insight and wisdom from a great many disparate sources; but those sights exist too, and are far older, more widespread, and better researched than mine, and have much larger followings to boot.

As for myself, I hope to leave behind a legacy someday that will change the world for the better, but I don’t feel as though my life is interesting enough that I could blog about such things on a daily basis.

But maybe I’m wrong.  Maybe there are some of you reading this who enjoy what I have to write about.  I don’t know.  It’s just that, a lot of the experiences I have that people might think are interesting just seem like ordinary occurrences to me now.

I don’t consider myself to be a very imaginative or creative writer.  I just write about what I know and these are the things that I know and have experienced.  I hope that’s enough and that someone finds it worth their time to read, and that it may one day help them in a way that no one else could have.

There’s still a lot of stuff left to cover.  Halloween is fast approaching, as are a bunch of other holidays.  I have some more symbols to go over, as well as some more conspiracies.  And I also have a few little annecdotes that I want to share, which I feel are rather appropriate for this time of year.

So all that’s coming up.  I hope you enjoy it and are able to take away something from it.  Thanks for reading.

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Mindfuck #3: I Am

Posted in All, Psychology, Spirituality with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 1, 2010 by marushiadark

“No matter what ya calls me, I am what I am an’ tha’s all I yam.” ~ Popeye

Very little thought is given to the way in which we use words, especially in reference to ourselves.  Often times, we place a great deal of our identity into things that are not us.  We equate who we really are with an object or concept that is not who we are, but rather something that we have.

For instance, people often say things like, “I am black” or “I am Christian” or “I am a redhead.”  Oh really?  That’s what you are?  Are you sure you don’t simply “have black skin” and “have Christian beliefs” and “have red hair”?

Such behavior is not inherited; it is learned.  We aren’t born identifying with things around us.  That line of thinking is socially conditioned into us.

Would you say that you are your car?  No, that’s ridiculous.  You’re very clearly not your car.  You have a car, but you are not your car.  A car is simply a vessel that you move around in.  You just attach yourself to the vehicle temporarily for the purposes of travel, carrying heavy loads, and doing other such tasks that you wouldn’t be able to do without it.

How about when you play a video game?  We often refer to the character as ourselves.  We say “I did this,” “I moved that,” “I shot the enemy,” and so forth.  But we are not the character.  The character is simply an avatar – a vessel – that we attach ourselves to by way of the controller in order to move about the digital world and do things like fly, shoot lasers, etc.  If you’ve ever been on a forum, you know that the little icon to the left of your post is also called your avatar.  It’s not you, either.  It’s merely a temporary representation of you that may not have anything to do with who you really are.

So what about your body?  Do you identify with that?  Your body is just a collection of cells that grouped together to form a collective unit.  It has more in common with a pixelated video game character than anything else, and your mind would then be the controller.  If you lose a few cells, do you necessarily stop being you?  If you lose an arm, a leg, or a kidney, do you stop being you?  No.  At least, you don’t have to stop being you.  It’s your choice whether or not you let such physical changes affect who you are.  Ultimately, all that really changes is what you can do with your body, but that doesn’t change who you are.  Even if you die, who you are will continue to live on in some form (even if it’s just a memory).

You are no more your body than you are your car or a character in a video game.  Who you are is the person in the driver’s seat, pushing the controls that make the body run, and your mind is the steering console.

“I think, therefore I am.” ~ René Descartes

During the early 17th century, a French philosopher by the name of René Descartes speculated on the basic principles of existence.  He wanted to know what was actually real, or at least what could be proven to be real.

There are two basic ways in which something can be known: empirically or logically.  Empiricism has to do with observation through the senses, while logic has to do with mental reasoning.  Descartes began with the simple observation that there are times when the senses appear to fail to accurately depict the world around us.  For instance, you see something out of the corner of your eye, but it isn’t actually there when you go to check on it with your full vision.  It is a mistake in observation.

Descartes reasoned that, due to the inaccuracies of the senses, it is suspect as to whether or not they can be trusted at all, so he rejects them entirely.

This establishes the notion that any and all physical things observed are potentially nothing more than mere illusions, fabrications of the mind.  It also leaves Descartes with nothing but logical reasoning, and all of that is just a fiction in the mind.  There are no perfectly straight lines in nature, no perfectly three-sided objects, no perfectly round objects; such things are mental short-hands of our own invention.  They do not actually exist.  They are illusions as well.

So then what does that leave?  Nothing, really.  Or does it?

If everything is merely an illusion, then there must be something that is being disillusioned.  There must be some observer of the trick.  Descartes himself referred to these illusions as the act of some demon.  But if there was a demon, the demon must have a victim to play his tricks on, even if that victim is simply himself.

Descartes’ method does not really give us much detail as to the qualities of the observer, just that there is one and that we can be 100% certain of this.  For all anyone knows, the world could be completely accurate as we observe it, or we could be a free-floating consciousness in a void without a body; but it can never be proven one way or the other what the actual nature of reality is.  So everything besides “I am” or “I exist” must be taken on faith.

This tends to piss off a lot of empiricists and scientists that rely heavily or even exclusively on their empirical observations.  Such a conclusion would pull the carpet out from under their feet by establishing the fickle nature of even their most basic assumptions.

“And God said to Moses, ‘I AM WHO I AM.’  And he said, ‘Thus you shall say to the children of Israel, ‘I AM has sent me to you’ … This is my name forever, and this is my memorial to all generations. ” ~ Exodus 3:14-15

Scientists aren’t the only ones pissed off by this conclusion.

Among those that believe in Judaism, Christianity, or Islam, there is much time spent worrying and debating over pedantic little details like “Is God’s name YHWH or YHVH?  Jehovah or Allah?” “Is Jesus, Yeshu, or Yeshua the correct name of Christ?”  “What color was Jesus’ skin?”  “Is it sinful for me to take only the bread and not the wine during communion?” “If I eat meat on a Friday, am I going to hell for it?”  “If I forgot to say PBUH after Mohammad’s name, will God hate me?”  “Do I need to wash my hands before prayer?”  “If I have a cheeseburger, is God going to punish me for not staying Kosher?”

If your focus is on minor details like that, then I’m sorry to say that you have missed the forest for the trees.  Without seeing the bigger picture, these little things are rather irrelevant.  If your car doesn’t even have wheels, what does it matter if the dashboard lights aren’t working?  Even if the engine worked perfectly, you’re not really getting anywhere, now are you?

All three faiths respect and defer to Exodus and to Moses.  So if you claim to be a believer of Christianity, Judaism, or Islam, there’s really no excuse for not knowing and understanding this particular passage.  God spells out rather clearly here as to who and what he is.

God is.  It’s as simple as that.  Most everything else is just minor details.

You are.  I am.  That’s as much as anyone can ever truly know for sure.  If it turns out that there is no God and we’re just a consciousness in a void; then by definition, you are God because you are the creator of the whole universe, since you are the one creating the illusion.  You call the shots, so why would you cast yourself, or anyone else, into eternal torment?  Why would you make yourself perform rituals and subjugating acts of worship?  You are the God of your own universe.

My Reason for Being Here

Posted in All, Miscellaneous, Psychology, Science, Spirituality with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 4, 2010 by marushiadark

“Do you feel it … our connection … some part of you imprinted onto me …” ~ Agent Smith

A lot has been said of first impressions.  Personally, regardless of how I might feel about someone initially, I know deep down that people can and do change over time and that, unless you wear your heart on your sleeve at all times, it’s impossible to know everything about a person from just one encounter.

The trouble with first impressions is that they require us to know ourselves well enough to present only our best qualities, in order that we might invite our acquaintances to feel comfortable around us and keep them coming back for more.  Only after we’ve laid a solid foundation do we find the courage to open up and reveal our less flattering and more unstable features.

For me, my life has been all about constant growth and self-improvement.  I’ll be the first to say that there are many many times I wished I could have taken something back or done things differently, or “if only I had had the wisdom and foresight I do now” … but then, if there’s one thing I’ve come to learn, it’s that everything in life happens for a reason, even if we’re not entirely or even remotely aware of what that reason is.

“I don’t fully understand how it happened … it is at this point irrelevant.  What matters is that whatever happened, happened for a reason.” ~ Agent Smith

Science teaches us the laws of causality and conservation of all things.  Religion teaches us that God or karma or something in between is responsible for the outcome.  I think each side has a piece of the answer and that the truth is much more interesting than that.

As they say, “truth is stranger than fiction.”

Which brings us at last to the reason why I’m here now, writing this blog, sharing my thoughts with you and the world.  It’s precisely this idea of sharing that has brought me here.

I’ve never been particularly passionate about anything in my life.  I’ve never been able to follow through on any endeavor I set out for and for the longest time, I sought solutions to my problems.  I sought answers to my questions and have learned a few things along the way.  I struggled and suffered, mostly internally, and in my own mind, to find my place in the world and the reason for my being here.  And it wasn’t until recently that I found the reason behind one of the most elusive mysteries of all: why am I here?

What reason I have is only a small part, a mere fragment of its full potential; but it’s certainly enough for me to be able to follow through with this journey a little longer until, hopefully, I come to some sort of destination (or at least a more permanent resting place).

“There’s no escaping reason, no denying purpose; because as we both know, without purpose, we would not exist.  It is purpose that created us, purpose that connects us, purpose that pulls us that, guides us, that drives us.  It is purpose that defines us, that binds us.” ~ Agent Smith

To find the reason for one’s existence is a beautiful thing and a very empowering thought that guides us and binds us along the path of life.  My purpose in this life is inexorably linked with that of every other human being on this planet, whether I realize it or not, whether you realize it or not; whether I choose to accept and believe it or not and whether you choose to accept and believe it or not.  My passion in life has been self-improvement and fulfillment, and that means doing all I can to help others accomplish the same, to whatever path that may lead us.

And that is my reason for being here.