Archive for Job

Symbols, Part 7: The Vesica Piscis

Posted in All, Economics, Miscellaneous, Psychology, Spirituality with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 24, 2010 by marushiadark

“A great lie is like a great fish on dry land; it may fret and fling and make a frightful bother, but it cannot hurt you.  You have only to keep still and it will die of itself.” ~ George Crabbe, poet

In continuing our exploration of symbolism, we come to yet another symbol that is often seen but little understood – the vesica piscis.  A circle is defined as the set of points that is a certain distance from a fixed point in the two-dimensional plane.  If we take two circles and overlap them, such that each circle touches the other’s center, the resulting shape is called a vesica piscis.  It is a symbol of duality and sacred union, which is why it’s not surprising that most people see this symbol in a Venn Diagram where the middle area is used to describe those parts that are common to two otherwise disparate groups.

The vesica piscis is one of a number of different constructions used in sacred geometry.  Its form is used in the crafting of lancet windows, church doors, the flower of life, the triquetra (a pagan trinity symbol), and a variation of the all-seeing eye.  The vesica piscis, and its variations, are undoubtedly solar symbols.  So why is it’s most familiar iteration the Ichthys or Jesus fish?

“Or speak to the earth, and it will teach you; and the fish of the sea will explain to you.” ~ Job 12:8

In my last post, I talked about the prevalence of the sun is mythologies and world religions, including Christianity.  However, there is one aspect that I have yet to cover.

In addition to appearing in a new sign every month, the sun also goes through a 2150-year cycle known as the precession of the equinoxes, where-in the sun appears in a different constellation at the time of the Spring equinox.  You’ve probably heard the Earth, Wind, and Fire song “Age of Aquarius,” in which the band sings about the dawning of the new age.  What’s being referred to here is that humanity will soon (in about 150 years from now) be able to look up at the time of the Spring Equinox and see that the sun is entering into the constellation Aquarius.

Every 2150 years, the Spring Equinox goes backwards through the twelve signs.  About 10,000 B.C. to 8000 B.C., the equinox was in the Age of Leo, the lion, whose planetary counterpart is the sun.  During this time, the Pyramids of Giza and the Great Spinx were built.

Fast forward about 4000 years and we get to the dawn of civilizations like the Egyptian Old Kingdom.  This was the beginning of the Age of Taurus, the bull, which was symbolized by Horus and other sun gods, but also by the goddess Hathor, who symbolized supreme love, motherhood, and fertility.  The Age of Taurus was an age of sex, drugs, pleasure, and ancestral worship (home and hearth).  This age was displaced with the birth of Moses, roughly corresponding to the Age of Aries, the ram.  This age marked the bringing of law and order and strict ritual observance.  In the Book of Exodus, Moses slays a number of Hebrews for continuing to worship the Golden Calf.  Throughout the Old Testament, there is plenty of reference to the ram and the lamb.  When God told Moses to create the tabernacle, there was an alter on which young lambs were slaughtered and burnt as sacrificial offerings.  Many of the patriarchs and prophets were also shepherds (sheep herders).  This age was then displaced with the birth of Christ, ushering in the Age of Pisces.  The Piscean Age marked the beginning of a new spiritual and esoteric form of belief, as opposed to iconic or ritual observance.  Many of Christ’s teachings seem almost profoundly mystical for their time.  And just as Exodus describes the transition from Taurus to Aries, some of the earliest accounts in the Gospels tell of shepherds being called to visit Christ in his infancy.

Throughout Jesus’ later life, he performs many miracles involving fish and water.  Some examples include turning water into wine, walking on water, feeding five thousand people with only a few loafs of bread and two fish, telling Peter to find a fish with a coin in its belly, having some fisherman cast on the other side of the boat to get a big haul, and so forth.  During the Last Supper, Jesus transposes the Jewish Passover with a newer, more simplified ritual, and many Christians baptize themselves in water as Christ was baptized in the Jordan River.  The Papal Miter even resembles a fish.

Recall from my article on the Solar Cross that I showed how Christ is nothing more than a sun god in a long line of sun gods.  To be more specific, Jesus is a sun god in the Age of Pisces.  Between that and the numerous references to fish and water, we can see why the earliest depictions of Christ were either as the sun, or in symbols such as the anchor and two fish.  It is from this imagery that the modern day Jesus fish is derived.  Not only is the Ichthys a representation of the fish, but it is also a variation of the Vesica Piscis (also spelt Vesica Pisces), which is a symbol of the sun and sacred union.

In addition to its use as a sacred geometric symbol, the vesica piscis can also be found in the logos for Mastercard, Audi, Double-Tree, Gucci, and the Olympic Rings.  Its relation to sacred union of two halves is also partly where the tradition of wedding bands comes from, being a sacred union between male and female (yin and yang, sun and moon).

Now, some of you more observant people may note that the positions of the stars in the sky don’t exactly jive with the alignments of the months of the Zodiac.  And you’d be right.  Though we’re in the Age of Pisces, nearing the Age of Aquarius, and the sun appears in Pisces during the equinox, we still celebrate the Spring Equinox at the beginning of the month of Aries.  Clearly, the entire system is out of whack, and this is what the movie Esoteric Agenda refers to as the “error in time.”  It is an error because we humans have not properly readjusted our calenders to match the motions of the heavens.

The astrological system most popularly used is known as the tropical zodiac.  In the tropical zodiac, preservation of the symbolism and the seasons is more important than the actual alignment.  However, there is another system known as the sidreal zodiac that is offset by the correct time (or at least a more correct time).  Perhaps we should be using that one instead?  Or maybe, when we finally enter into the new Age of Aquarius, we’ll have worked it all out and realigned our calendar systems.  I don’t really know, but it’s something to think about.

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Thoughts for Labor Day

Posted in All, Economics, Humor, Politics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 6, 2010 by marushiadark

“… to celebrate work by being at play.” ~ Unknown

Today is Labor Day (not to be confused with Labour Day), a day commissioned to honor the social and economic achievements of the working class.  Sounds great, doesn’t it?  Having parades in honor of the hard-working, blue collar men and women of America.

How do you plan to celebrate this most American of holidays?  Take the day off?  Have a barbecue?  Watch a parade?  Go to a ball game?  Or maybe just sleep until noon?  After all, you probably haven’t had a Monday to yourself since Memorial Day.

Yes, Labor Day is a day dedicated to you, the L5 vertebra in the back-bone of our society … or at least that’s how they sell it to us.

If you were to look at the history of Labor Day, you’d see very quickly that it was actually the result of political expediency in an effort to placate the masses.  President Grover Cleveland, no doubt at the behest of railroad lobbyists, ordered the U.S. military to step in and put down a group of workers exercising their Constitutional right to peaceful protest against what they believed to be unfair working conditions.  Many workers were killed and the whole thing was a political disaster stacked on top of questionable authority, so the President hastened the approval of making Labor Day a national holiday in the hopes that people would be too distracted by the big fancy floats to remember what happened.

Talk about buying people off!

But that’s all in the past, right?  The U.S. government no longer treats workers like crap.  I mean, this isn’t Communist Russia where we have things like graduated income tax, confiscation of property, centralized credit systems, centralized communication and transportation systems, property taxes, state-sponsored schooling, disproportionate rights for immigrants and rebels, … oh wait.  I guess we do have all that stuff over here in America.

Just that we had our workers revolt a few years before the Russians did.  And here we were worried about them beating us at something.

“If hard work made you richditch diggers would be rich.” ~ Proverb on Work

You might have heard that quote before, perhaps even in a letter about starting a business from home.  I’m not here to tell you to go and do that, but it raises an interesting point that there’s a disparity between what we’ve been conditioned to believe about working to earn money and the truth.

We’re taught from an early age that having a job and working hard makes you a successful and upstanding member of society; yet for most of us, the reality is probably a lot different.  The truly sad part, though, is that we’re all aware of it to some extent, but we either ignore it or think we’re powerless to do anything about it.

For instance, have you ever wondered how it is that 1% of the population earns 95% of all the money and can get away without paying any taxes on it to boot?  If you haven’t, then consider this is your wake-up call.

That 1% owns 95% give or take a few percent.  So if there were a hundred people in a room with a million dollars between them, one person would have $950,000 and each of the other ninety-nine people would have little more than $500 each.  Does that not seem unfair to you?  I count myself among the 99% and I think that’s unfair.  I mean, there’s ninety-nine of us and only one of him.  Why don’t we all just get together and make him give us a bigger cut?  Maybe he’s a really great guy that contributes a lot to society, so he can get a slightly bigger slice than the rest of us and that’s fair, but I seriously doubt he’s ninety-five times better than any one of us.  As a matter of fact, in all likelihood, he’s probably about ninety-five times worse than any of us.

But I’m generalizing of course.  Not that you go out and murder every rich man on the planet, although in the long-run it might be a lot fewer bodies.

“All the measures of the government are directed to the purpose of making the rich richer and the poor poorer.” ~ William Henry Harrison

I once read that, in a single year, David Rockefeller made $16,000,000 and paid no taxes on any of it; yet in order for us to pay off the outstanding national debt, income taxes of every man and woman in America would have to be raised to something like 65% of their total income.  With the amount you pay on taxes now, do you think any of us could survive such a thing?  Maybe it’d be worth it if we got something in return for it.  But I bet most of you reading this article right now are probably struggling with what you already have, trying to make ends meet while busting your ass for forty, forty-five hours a week or working two jobs or something, with kids and rent and family medical expenses on top of all of that.

I should know, since I’ve seen my own family go through that very thing.  My mom works as a nurse – sometimes twelve hours a day – and my dad is a general contractor.  My first job was working for him over the course of several years for next to no pay at all.  For a while, my dad had no work during the most recent recession, so my mom was supporting us all by herself.  Ours is a family of four kids, two dogs, and a mortgage.  Thank God we’re all healthy and went to public schools or we’d be in even worse shape than we are now.

“There’s nothing so useless as doing efficiently that which should not be done at all.” ~ Peter F. Drucker, Social Ecologist and Management Consultant

As Peter Joesph, creator of the movie Zeitgeist (linked in sidebar) put it, “Most people think of having a job as some form of basic instinct.”  Without much question on our part, we sell our time and labor out for money to some dictator we call “boss” for little pay and even less respect.  And the jobs we do are done solely because, if we don’t, we are going to lose our house or our health insurance or our vehicles or whatever.

Obviously, it’s not a totally unreasonable thing to do what you have to in order to survive, but working harder isn’t always a guarantee of fulfilling our needs, either.  And even then, we’re just taking care of our physiological needs.  We’re being kept alive to do … what, exactly?  Working hard to keep us alive just enough so that we can keep on working hard?  That’s what I thought.  What’s the point of laboring if you don’t get to enjoy the fruits of your labor once in a while?  Most people put off their enjoyment until they’re old enough to retire (which is usually some time in their sixties, if at all).  But even a poor orange grower gets to eat oranges one season out of every year.

It’s one thing to save for a rainy day, it’s another thing entirely to save every penny for a day that might never come.  If you aren’t living and enjoying life now, then you’re doing something wrong.

What that something is depends on your particular situation, but there are a few general things you can do.  For starters, I’d recommend reading the book The Richest Man in Babylon, as it has a lot of wisdom on earning money and making it work for you.  Wisdom that is really timeless.

Working hard will not be enough to get you what you want in life.  Trading your income for labor is something that a robot or a well-trained monkey can do and you’re not a robot or a monkey (not even a well-trained monkey), so you need to begin to work smarter, not harder.  Instead of working that dead-end job in retail or telemarketing (which is only helping to bring down the whole of society), figure out what it is you love doing and develop a plan around that.  You’ll be a lot happier for it.  And take some time out to enjoy life once in a while.  Otherwise, you’re little more than a cog in some great big corporate machine that churns out tools and bureaucrats by the barrel-full.

As I’ve often said, there’s a difference between work, a job, a career, and a hobby you get paid for.  Work is back-breaking labor, a job is a tedious task, a career is something you’re stuck doing for the rest of your life and a hobby you get paid for is just that: a hobby you get PAID for.  Wouldn’t it be nice if we could all do what we loved and then get paid for it?  If we did, I’m sure some robotics geek could build the machines to do all the other things we hate … and he would have fun while doing it, too.