Archive for Cross

Symbols, Part 7: The Vesica Piscis

Posted in All, Economics, Miscellaneous, Psychology, Spirituality with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 24, 2010 by marushiadark

“A great lie is like a great fish on dry land; it may fret and fling and make a frightful bother, but it cannot hurt you.  You have only to keep still and it will die of itself.” ~ George Crabbe, poet

In continuing our exploration of symbolism, we come to yet another symbol that is often seen but little understood – the vesica piscis.  A circle is defined as the set of points that is a certain distance from a fixed point in the two-dimensional plane.  If we take two circles and overlap them, such that each circle touches the other’s center, the resulting shape is called a vesica piscis.  It is a symbol of duality and sacred union, which is why it’s not surprising that most people see this symbol in a Venn Diagram where the middle area is used to describe those parts that are common to two otherwise disparate groups.

The vesica piscis is one of a number of different constructions used in sacred geometry.  Its form is used in the crafting of lancet windows, church doors, the flower of life, the triquetra (a pagan trinity symbol), and a variation of the all-seeing eye.  The vesica piscis, and its variations, are undoubtedly solar symbols.  So why is it’s most familiar iteration the Ichthys or Jesus fish?

“Or speak to the earth, and it will teach you; and the fish of the sea will explain to you.” ~ Job 12:8

In my last post, I talked about the prevalence of the sun is mythologies and world religions, including Christianity.  However, there is one aspect that I have yet to cover.

In addition to appearing in a new sign every month, the sun also goes through a 2150-year cycle known as the precession of the equinoxes, where-in the sun appears in a different constellation at the time of the Spring equinox.  You’ve probably heard the Earth, Wind, and Fire song “Age of Aquarius,” in which the band sings about the dawning of the new age.  What’s being referred to here is that humanity will soon (in about 150 years from now) be able to look up at the time of the Spring Equinox and see that the sun is entering into the constellation Aquarius.

Every 2150 years, the Spring Equinox goes backwards through the twelve signs.  About 10,000 B.C. to 8000 B.C., the equinox was in the Age of Leo, the lion, whose planetary counterpart is the sun.  During this time, the Pyramids of Giza and the Great Spinx were built.

Fast forward about 4000 years and we get to the dawn of civilizations like the Egyptian Old Kingdom.  This was the beginning of the Age of Taurus, the bull, which was symbolized by Horus and other sun gods, but also by the goddess Hathor, who symbolized supreme love, motherhood, and fertility.  The Age of Taurus was an age of sex, drugs, pleasure, and ancestral worship (home and hearth).  This age was displaced with the birth of Moses, roughly corresponding to the Age of Aries, the ram.  This age marked the bringing of law and order and strict ritual observance.  In the Book of Exodus, Moses slays a number of Hebrews for continuing to worship the Golden Calf.  Throughout the Old Testament, there is plenty of reference to the ram and the lamb.  When God told Moses to create the tabernacle, there was an alter on which young lambs were slaughtered and burnt as sacrificial offerings.  Many of the patriarchs and prophets were also shepherds (sheep herders).  This age was then displaced with the birth of Christ, ushering in the Age of Pisces.  The Piscean Age marked the beginning of a new spiritual and esoteric form of belief, as opposed to iconic or ritual observance.  Many of Christ’s teachings seem almost profoundly mystical for their time.  And just as Exodus describes the transition from Taurus to Aries, some of the earliest accounts in the Gospels tell of shepherds being called to visit Christ in his infancy.

Throughout Jesus’ later life, he performs many miracles involving fish and water.  Some examples include turning water into wine, walking on water, feeding five thousand people with only a few loafs of bread and two fish, telling Peter to find a fish with a coin in its belly, having some fisherman cast on the other side of the boat to get a big haul, and so forth.  During the Last Supper, Jesus transposes the Jewish Passover with a newer, more simplified ritual, and many Christians baptize themselves in water as Christ was baptized in the Jordan River.  The Papal Miter even resembles a fish.

Recall from my article on the Solar Cross that I showed how Christ is nothing more than a sun god in a long line of sun gods.  To be more specific, Jesus is a sun god in the Age of Pisces.  Between that and the numerous references to fish and water, we can see why the earliest depictions of Christ were either as the sun, or in symbols such as the anchor and two fish.  It is from this imagery that the modern day Jesus fish is derived.  Not only is the Ichthys a representation of the fish, but it is also a variation of the Vesica Piscis (also spelt Vesica Pisces), which is a symbol of the sun and sacred union.

In addition to its use as a sacred geometric symbol, the vesica piscis can also be found in the logos for Mastercard, Audi, Double-Tree, Gucci, and the Olympic Rings.  Its relation to sacred union of two halves is also partly where the tradition of wedding bands comes from, being a sacred union between male and female (yin and yang, sun and moon).

Now, some of you more observant people may note that the positions of the stars in the sky don’t exactly jive with the alignments of the months of the Zodiac.  And you’d be right.  Though we’re in the Age of Pisces, nearing the Age of Aquarius, and the sun appears in Pisces during the equinox, we still celebrate the Spring Equinox at the beginning of the month of Aries.  Clearly, the entire system is out of whack, and this is what the movie Esoteric Agenda refers to as the “error in time.”  It is an error because we humans have not properly readjusted our calenders to match the motions of the heavens.

The astrological system most popularly used is known as the tropical zodiac.  In the tropical zodiac, preservation of the symbolism and the seasons is more important than the actual alignment.  However, there is another system known as the sidreal zodiac that is offset by the correct time (or at least a more correct time).  Perhaps we should be using that one instead?  Or maybe, when we finally enter into the new Age of Aquarius, we’ll have worked it all out and realigned our calendar systems.  I don’t really know, but it’s something to think about.

Symbols, Part 6: The Solar Cross

Posted in All, Miscellaneous, Politics, Psychology, Spirituality with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 23, 2010 by marushiadark

“The best thing about the sun … it never tells me I’m unworthy.” ~ George Carlin

Today is the Autumnal Equinox, the time of year when the day is the same length as the night, and I can’t think of any more appropriate time of year (except maybe Christmas) to talk about the Solar Cross.  The solar cross is one of the oldest, most ubiquitous, and most universally recognized religious symbols in human history.  You’ve probably seen it all over the place without even recognizing it.  Simply stated, it is a circle with two lines through it that intersect in the center.

The Greek Cross, the Celtic Cross, the Latin Cross, the Swastika, the Chi Rho, the Buddhist Wheel of Life, the Egyptian Ankh, and a host of other symbols all derive from it.  It is also found in Central AmericaMesopotamia, North America, and many of other places.

In short, the solar cross is the symbol in most of the world’s religions.

Among other things, it is symbolic of the four directions, the four elements, the four root races, the four stages of life, the four humours, the four seasons, and so forth.  But perhaps most importantly, most commonly, and as its name suggests, it is a symbol of the sun.

“Behold, my friends, the spring is come; the earth has gladly received the embraces of the sun, and we shall soon see the results of their love.” ~ Sitting Bull

The documentary film Zeitgeist, created by a man known only as Peter Joseph, is arguably the most popular viral video on the internet.  The first part of the video is based on the life’s work of researchers such as Jordan Maxwell and Acharya S.  It outlines very plainly the history and usage of the Solar Cross in various religions and cultures throughout the world.  Without wishing to completely rehash Zetigeist, the basic story is as follows:

The ancients believed the sun was the light of the world and the savior of mankind.  Every night, the sun would set into the underworld and rise again each morning to conquer the forces of darkness and “evil.”  At certain points throughout the year, it would undergo particular behaviors from the perspective of the earth, and these are the basis of many ancient myths.

For instance, on December 21, the Winter Solstice, the sun reaches its lowest point in the sky and the day is shortest while night is longest.  For the next three days, it would appear to not move at all before rising one degree higher in the sky on December 25.  To the ancients, this motion symbolized the death and rebirth of the sun and it is why Christ and many other religious figures have their date of birth on December 25.  The death and resurrection of the sun was not celebrated, however, until the Spring Equinox when the days began to become longer than the nights and light officially conquered the darkness.  The feast of Easter derives from the Feast of Ostara, the goddess of dawn, who was symbolized by rabbits and eggs.

Throughout the calendar year, the sun would pass through the twelve constellations of the Zodiac.  In Christianity, these are symbolized by the twelve apostles.  Da Vinci’s Last Supper depicts not only the twelve signs, but also Christ centered on the cross as the sun.  The number twelve appears throughout the bible for similar reasons, all being a reference to the zodiac.  The twelve apostles, the twelve tribes of Israel, the twelve prophets, the twelve kings, etc.  The twelve gods of Olympus, the twelve titans, and the twelve labors of Hercules are examples of the same, as used in Greco-Roman mythologies.

In the book of Revelation, chapter 4, verse 7, there is mention of several beings with the heads of a bull, a lion, an eagle, and a man.  These are the symbols of Taurus, Leo, Scorpio (which was symbolized by an eagle before it was a scorpion), and Aquarius, respectively.  This imagery can also be found in occultism, such as on the Wheel of Fortune card in the tarot deck.

There is no shortage of parallels that can be drawn between the myths of majors religions, especially Christianity, and the motions of the sun as it travels through the heavens.  The Solar Cross, i.e. the Cross of the Zodiac, is a shorthand representation of this concept, which is really just an ancient pagan spiritual symbol.

Some of the earliest constructions of mankind reflect a worship of the sun.  For instance, it has recently been demonstrated by archeologists that the monoliths at Stonehenge were used as a solar shrine to mark the Winter Solstice and there is a sister site some miles away that marks the Summer Solstice as well.  The Egyptians, Mayans, and Aztecs are all well known for their worship of the sun also.  I could go on and on about this, but this is just an introduction.  The point is that, the more you begin to research into comparative religions and history, the more you begin to find sun worship everywhere.

Though its most common use is as a religious symbol, the Solar Cross is also used in a number of corporate logos as well.  Most notable are BWM, Alfa-Romeo, and Bayer.

Also keep in mind that there are many derivatives of the Solar Cross, as I mentioned in the beginning of this article.  For instance, the equal-armed cross is used prolifically in medicine, and in the logos of Chevrolet and the Red Cross.  The cross is used in national flags, such as the flag of Switzerland and many others.

The Cross of Lorraine, aka the double cross (play on words, much?), is used in the logos for BloodRayne, Holiday Inn, Nabisco, and Exxon-Mobile.  It’s also the symbol of the ruling party in V for Vendetta, with Chancellor Sutler being the dictator of a British police state.  The parallels between that and Nazi Germany, headed by Chancellor Adolf Hitler; or the Empire from Star Wars, headed by Chancellor Palpatine, should raise a number of alarming questions in your mind about just what sorts of people are using these symbols against us and why.

Symbols, Part 2: The Swastika

Posted in All, Humor, Miscellaneous, Politics, Psychology, Spirituality with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 19, 2010 by marushiadark

“What luck for the rulers that men do not think.” ~ Adolf Hitler

In my last post, I talked about the nature of symbols and how certain political, corporate, and religious groups have ruined those symbols for the rest of us by creating links in our minds between them and those symbols.  Of these, perhaps none is more hopelessly bastardized than the swastika.  Originally, the swastika was a symbol of love, peace, and enlightenment, with many cultures around the world having their own variations of it.  Both the swastika and the Latin cross derive their forms and meanings from the earlier solar cross, which is one of the oldest and most universally recognized symbols in the world (that you’ve never heard of).

It’s not my intention to say that these are the only interpretations of these symbols, but rather, to inform you of their historical origins and uses; and to break you out of the one-to-one relationship with these symbols in an effort to get you thinking more laterally.

“A picture’s worth a thousand words.” ~ Proverb

They say that there are only six degrees of separation between any two parties.  So, for your consideration, I present Hitler to Jesus in only six steps:

From Nazi swastika to Crucifix in six steps.

Blows your mind, doesn’t it?  Of course, I probably could have done it in fewer steps if I wanted.  But this article’s more about the nature of symbols, than it is about comparing Christ with Hitler.

Everything is sacred and yet nothing is sacred.  Everything is profane and yet nothing is profane.  The same angels you summon to ward off your enemies shall appear as demons to them; and the same angels they employ to fight against you, to you shall appear as demons.  What’s good for the goose isn’t necessarily good for the gander. It’s all relative and all in the eye of the beholder.

Symbols, Part 1: Introduction

Posted in All, Economics, Media, Miscellaneous, Politics, Psychology with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 18, 2010 by marushiadark

“I leave symbols to the symbol-minded.” ~ George Carlin

Chances are, the first things we think of when we think of symbols are logos and religious emblems.  All major corporations have their own specific form of branding with an enigmatic logo to identify them to the public.  Religions use symbols like crosses, stars, wheels, the sun, the earth, and a whole host of others as representations of their specific beliefs.  But these aren’t the only symbols.

A symbol is anything that stands for something else.  Every letter and number is a symbol and the words they comprise are just oral or written symbols for ideas.  A kiss can be a tactile symbol of love or betrayal, depending on its context.  Your own body is just a symbol for who you are, just like your signature or your avatar on a forum.  People (or more specifically their actions) can be symbols for specific ideals or modes of thought.  Certain buildings, banners, and flags are also symbols for the same.  Money can be a symbol of status and power or of greed and corruption, and its lack can be a symbol of either suffering or enlightenment.

Really anything can be a symbol, and symbols can be symbols of other symbols, even.  We are undoubtedly creators and users of symbols, all of us.  In fact, we are the only creatures on the planet that use them, and we use them for pretty much everything.

“Most people are unwilling to seek and create their own interpretations of these symbols.  Instead, they blindly submit to preconceived definitions and connotations given by sources unknown.  Because of this, many things have been predetermined in our understanding of life without our knowledge.” ~ The Esoteric Agenda

If I were to say the word “swastika” to you, what’s the first thought that comes to your mind?  Probably a Nazi banner or something else to do with Nazis or Nazism, right?  What if I said “red, white, and blue”?  Probably the American flag, if you’re an American, or something about patriotism and government if you’re from a nation whose flag is red, white, and blue, such as England, America, France, Australia, and many others (most of them use the same colors).  If I said “cross,” your first thought would probably be a Latin cross, with or without the image of Jesus’ body hanging from it.

That right there is proof that we are fixated on symbols that have predetermined definitions and connotations, and that we allow others to dictate for us what to think.  The swastika has its origins thousands of years before the Nazis ever existed, and it was largely a symbol of peace and power.  The cross has its origins thousands of years before Christianity ever arose.  And “red, white, and blue,” are just colors – frequencies of light waves.

Symbols have no meaning except what we give them, so why are our interpretations of these symbols so specific and so limited?  The only reason our thoughts would be so restricted is through deliberate social conditioning.  Symbols and their meanings are not something genetic, but rather they are learned and culturally specific.

Does that mean that everyone whose first thought when I said “swastika” was “Nazi” is a mind-slave?  No, not really.  It does if those are the only things you thought about, but those with more knowledge and awareness will not be limited to just one interpretation of such symbols.

To illustrate the difference, one of my teachers used the example of “gum” as a symbol.  A ditsy, bubble-gum chewing, Valley Girl cheerleader with no awareness or knowledge at all might only think of chewing gum; but someone else might think of chewing gum and think of other things, like a gum tree, gum arabic, or even gummy substances.  The point is that a person who’s not a mind-slave is in full control of their mind and is actively using it to make mental connections to as many things as possible, developing a neurological web instead of a linear, one-to-one association between symbol and idea.

When a corporation, religion, or government body creates a symbol, there is next to no leeway in what they want you to think with regards to that symbol.  Corporations want you to associate their company and their product with it.  They pay millions of dollars to develop logos that will hit deep psychological nerves in your subconscious and create nuerological links between those symbols and the desire for certain products.  Religions demand your focus and devotion to their symbols, which only serves to distract you from truly experiencing life the way it was meant to be lived.  This is why God made it a sin to worship such images.  And governments want your loyalty and your obedience and to keep you distracted with these symbols of pride and patriotism while they carry out large-scale violations against our rights, most-notably war.  In the pledge of allegiance, we’re told to pay homage to the flag and that burning a flag is illegal in many places, even though the flag is just a piece of cloth to which we add our own meaning.

Such symbols are most prolifically portrayed through the media, Hollywood, and through advertisements.  Many of them are variations of the same bastardizations of more spiritually enlightening icons: the sun, the moon, the all-seeing eye, the pentagram, the hexagram, the double-square, the cross, the pyramid, the torch, the eagle, the yin-yang, vesica piscis, skull and crossbones, and so on.  These symbols are not inherently good or bad, but are only good or bad in so far as the meanings and purposes we assign to them.  Look around sometime and see just how prolific these symbols really are.