Archive for Corporation

Hierarchy of Law

Posted in All, Economics, Politics, Spirituality with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 2, 2010 by marushiadark

“Then God said, ‘Let us create man in our own image, according to our likeness; let them have dominion … over all the earth and every other creeping thing that creeps upon on the earth.” ~ Genesis 1:26

In my last post, I talked about how we tend to identify with things that have nothing to do with who we really are, and how we are simply the observers on this universe.  It is important that we understand who we are and what are place is in the hierarchy of the universe.  If we don’t, then we become the slaves of our creations instead of their masters.  Many people are suffering at the hands of religions, governments, and corporations because they have forgotten that they are the creators and that our position is of higher authority.  It’s as though we are serving our spoons and our hammers.  To correct this, we need only remember our place in this world and who we are and then exercise our authority as true sovereigns.

So the most fundamental level is the level of God and the soul, which is the level of being.

From there, the soul may choose to create a mind to think and reason with, which may entail the temporary division of the mind into parts to create the illusion of separateness.  So now we have two levels: the level of the soul and the level of the mind.  We are a soul, but have a mind.

Of course, from this, we can infer that the mind in turn creates illusions and avatars in the form of a physical body.  So now we know there are at least three levels: soul, mind, and body.  We are a soul, but have a mind and a body.

“What’s in a name?  That which we call a rose, by any other name, would still smell as sweet.” ~ Romeo and Juliet, Act 2, Scene 2, Lines 1-2

If you take something and someone else then claims it as their own, it’s common to retort, “Well, I didn’t see your name on it.”  Of course, we know that there is no such mark.  There’s nothing there to identify the object as being the property of any individual in particular, so it becomes fair game to all.  Yet in our everyday lives, we place so much identity and attachment to our names in reference to who we are.

When you were born, you didn’t come out of your mother’s womb with a UPC barcode on your body, did you?  There were no inherent identifying marks of any kind that could be misconstrued as labels stating who you are, were there?  Of course not.  So why is it that when asked, “Who are you?” we answer with our name?

A name is not something you have inherently.  It is something bestowed upon you by another.  And such a name can be different depending on who’s referring to you.  A child may call you “Mom.”  A parent may call you “Son.”  Your dog may call you “Arf.”  The IRS calls you by your Social Security Number “123-45-6789.”  These are all names given to you as a means of referring to you, but they aren’t you.  There’s not even a rule that says you have to have a name at all.  There’s no law that says you have to carry around any sort of identification of any kind just to walk down the street.

In that scene from the movie Shooter where the cop stops Bob Swagger and asks to see his ID, he could have just turned around and asked, “Are you suggesting I’m obligated to carry around ID with me?”  The cop would then have had to either let him go or prove that there was a law requiring him to carry ID.

In the spy business, agents rarely use their real names.  Those names are just NOCs the agency gives them.  Those names have no more to do with who those agents are than your birth name has anything to do with who you are.  Your name is something that you choose to use or not.  You can change it anytime you like.

You are a soul, you have a mind, a body, and a name.  This distinction is very important for anyone that considers themselves a free individual because, as you’ll soon see, a name is everything in law.

“Bob Marley isn’t my name.  I don’t even know my name yet.” ~ Bob Marley

Do you know what your name is and when you were born?  If you do, you must have a time machine or some sort of clairvoyant powers, because you weren’t alive at the time of your birth to know all that stuff.  What you think you know is the result of hearsay from your parents and others who were around at that time.  But you, yourself, don’t have first-hand knowledge of that.  So your name is, at best, an accepted designation; and your date of birth, at best, is an estimation.

Were you also aware that you have not one, but two names and dates of birth?  In the legal system, you actually represent two persons: a natural person and a legal person.

The word “person” in law is a tricky thing because it can refer to either a natural person or a legal person, and often there is no telling which is being used.  Usually, it applies to both.  You see, law is a very precise thing.  Every word, phrase, spelling, and punctuation mark changes the meaning of what is written.  For instance, the phrase “A young, bare man” has a totally different meaning from “A young bear-man.”  But if I were to say both sentences aloud, without you seeing the spelling and punctuation, it could get quite confusing.

Just as there are two types of person, there are also two types of law: common law (the law of the land) and admiralty law (the law of water).  Common law is common sense and is the law of flesh and blood human beings.  Admiralty law is maritime law and is the law of commerce, taxes, businesses, and corporations.  Each has its own jurisdiction.

The so-called natural person is the name given to the flesh and blood human being.  It’s written using proper English Grammar with a capital initial letter and the rest in lower-case, such as John Henry Doe.  The legal person, however, is the name of a corporation and is written in all caps, such as JOHN HENRY DOE.  If you don’t believe that, just go ask a lawyer or a judge.

If you look at your driver’s license, credit card, bank statement, Social Security card, or other such commercial documents, you will likely see that the name on the document is written in ALL CAPS.  This means that you are operating under the jurisdiction of commercial law, not common law, and the rules are very different between the two.

Knowing that, it begins to make sense how a burglar can enter someone’s house illegally and win at court because he got hurt, even though he’s the one at fault.  It’s because you’re fighting in common law and he’s fighting in admiralty, and because he’s the plaintiff coming forward with a claim, he gets to choose which court to play in.

But how did all this happen?  How did we get two names and two birth dates?

“Your birth is a mistake you’ll spend your whole life trying to correct.” ~ Chuck Palahniuk, satirist

When a ship enters port, it travels down a canal, leaves the water, and is then placed onto dry land where the ship is then said to be “berthed.”  An officer of the State (such as a customs agent) will then ensure that the vessel is registered, complete with the ship’s name and date of berth.  He then gives the ship a registration number, which is recorded on a special piece of paper called a certificate of value and cargo manifest.  From that point on, the ship is subject to all the statutes and commercial laws of the jurisdiction that it’s in, so long as it resides in port.  In order to operate in commerce, the ship must obey these rules or it cannot do business.

What does that sound like to you?  Does that sound like something you’ve possibly heard of before?  No?  How about this.

Approximately nine months after your dad knocks up your mom, your body (a vessel for your soul) travels down your mother’s birth canal and leaves the water of the womb to enter onto dry land.  At this point, you have been birthed.  Shortly after, your mother will register the birth on a birth certificate and a State officer will file that with the county as proof of your manifestation into this world.  From that point on, you are subject to all the laws (commercial laws, that is) of whatever jurisdiction you were born in if you wish to do business and operate in commerce.

My, my, isn’t that interesting?  So does that mean your body is actually a commercial vessel subject to admiralty law?  It certainly sounds that way, doesn’t it?

“Like everyone else, you were born into bondage.  Into a prison that you cannot taste or see or touch.” ~ Morpheus

The 14th Amendment states that all persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside.  Recall that I said “person” has a dual meaning, that it can refer to a natural person or a legal person.  Wal-Mart is a corporation, a legal person, and has all the same rights as a person like you or me.  Doesn’t that just make your blood boil?

All of the commercial documents that you get over the course of your lifetime, from bank accounts, to credit cards, to driver’s licenses (or any licenses) … they all require you to have a birth certificate.  And those that don’t usually require presentment of other documents that do.

The ALL CAPS name on your documents is, in fact, a corporation.  The birth certificate your mother registered is actually a unique piece of work.  It bridges the gap between natural person and legal person and is what created the legal person in the first place, allowing it all the rights and privileges under commercial law, according to the 14th Amendment. In the game of commerce, it’s your playing token.

Having a registered birth certificate is both a blessing and a curse.  On the one hand, being under admiralty law affords you certain rights and privileges.  You can own a business, have a bank account, take out a mortgage for a home, collect Social Security and Medicare benefits, etc.  On the other hand, it also means you have to pay taxes and avoid certain things like putting drugs into your body.  After all, the State doesn’t want anything to happen to your vessel while you’re in their port.  Damaged ships on their turf reflect a bad image and can be a potential threat to their property.  Why do you think illegal immigrants are such a concern for them?

But you can’t have it both ways.  Either you accept the pros with the cons, or you give it all up entirely.

It’s been said that ignorance of the law is no excuse.  That may be true if you’re talking about common law, where the only real rule you have to remember is don’t infringe upon the rights and/or property of others.  But when it comes to the 16,000,000 or so commercial laws and statutes, I think most people would say that ignorance of the law is every excuse, because it’s just too much information to keep track of.  Yet, if you don’t know how to play the commercial game, you’ll likely suffer a humiliating defeat at the hands of those that do.

So you have two options.  Learn how to play the game properly, or stop playing.  Stopping is hard because so much of our society is based upon the commerce game.  However there are those that have gone and done this successfully.  Such people often form their own little communes away from civilization, away from commerce, technology, and all the trappings of modern life.

However, it would seem that a far more practical solution would be to learn the rules and enjoy the game as it was meant to be played so that we can take advantage of all the good things that modern life can offer us as well.

To do that, though, you must first realize who you really are.  You are a soul, which has a mind and a body.  The body has the name of a natural person and that natural person is then the player with the legal person being the game token.

You can think of the legal person as yet another avatar for your natural person, just like how a car acts as an avatar of your physical body, which is in turn the avatar of your soul.

I know that can sound quote complicated, but it’s really very simple.  Just remember that there is a hierarchy to all this: God / soul, mind, body, natural person (John Doe), legal person (JOHN DOE).  It’s really as simple as that.  No creation can be higher than its creator, so long as the creator is operating from a position of creator instead of a position of victim.  If you remember that you are a living soul and a part of God, then you are already three-quarters of the way to being totally free from the legal and corporate entities that we created down below.  The rest is just putting it into practice.

M is for Money

Posted in All, Economics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 27, 2010 by marushiadark

“So you think that money is the root of all evil.  Have you ever asked what is the root of all money?” ~ Ayn Rand

At the time of my writing this, I’ve yet to read Atlas Shrugged.  I think I might already know a great deal of what’s in it, much like when I first read The Lost Symbol.  However, at the insistence of my mother, and many others, apparently, I’ve made Atlas Shrugged the very next book on my reading list.

Even still, Ayn Rand makes a very good point.  What is money?  Have you ever really thought about it?

For most people, when you mention the word “money,” a lot of things come to mind.  To some, it means little green pieces of paper or metal with pictures of dead presidents on them.  For others, it may call to mind an image of the mint printing vast rolls of the stuff.  On the one hand, money can be the source of great stress and grief if we don’t have it, or great opportunity and abundance if we do.  Pious people avoid it like the plague, while people that have it are willing to do anything to get it and can’t seem to get enough of it.

Most of these are probably incomplete observations, made by equally  ill-informed observers.  I know that, for most of my own life, I kept having the wrong impression about money, and only recently am I beginning to see money for what it actually is.

But what is that, exactly?

The Uniform Commercial Code is the Bible of commercial law.  UCC Article 1, Section 201b, Line 24 gives the definition of money as it’s used throughout most of the world today:

“Money means a medium of exchange currently authorized or adopted by a domestic or foreign government.  The term includes a monetary unit of account established by an intergovernmental organization or by agreement between two or more countries.”

In brief, money is simply a medium of exchange, an I.O.U.

When you play Monopoly, the paper is just there to help regulate how much you’re worth in comparison to the other players.  If you run out, the game even tells you to make more money out of regular paper, because it’s just a medium of exchange with no inherent value of its own.  Or if you play in digital form, it’s all done via electronic transfers and moving numbers around.  It’s Bookkeeping, the Game and boy do we love playing it!

If this were a barter system, we’d trade goods directly, like a camel for five bags of potatoes, or whatever we happened to agree was an equivalent exchange.

Money is just an indirect way of trading.  For instance, say I had a hat, but needed a pair of shoes.  I meet a man who needs a hat but has an extra pair of shoes.  So I trade him the hat for the shoes.  Now this man, some time later, needs to buy food.  He needs the food more than his hat, so he finds someone who will make the trade with him.  In that process, the hat was used as money because it was the medium that facilitated exchanges.

If we wanted, we could really use anything for money, as long as it was agreed upon by everyone involved; and in ancient times, that’s exactly what happened.

It used to be that money was more than just worthless paper.  When things like gold, silver, beads, shells, stones, and feathers were all used as money, the money itself had inherent value.  It could be used in trade, or kept by its possessor because it was worth something for its own merit.  Over time, certain things like copper, gold, and silver became more standardized as money because their value as a medium of exchange was more universally accepted among disparate cultures.  Eventually, people began to store, lend, and borrow coins and soon the first banks were formed.  From there, it was a short while before people started carrying around certificates that represented an amount of hard currency being kept in a vault somewhere.  And thus, we arrive at paper money.

The documentary Money as Debt elaborates more on this concept and gives a brief, allegorical history of the evolution of money.

“For the love of money is the root of all kinds of evil, for which some have strayed from the faith in their greediness, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows.” ~ 1 Timothy 6:10

Money is a form of power.  So it follows that the love of money is the love of power and of control over one’s self and others.  What we do with that power, however, is the determining factor.

Greed and lack are just flaws in perception.  The world is nothing but abundant with wealth and resources for all, and then some, yet this misguided belief of never having enough to survive is what leads people to commit both great and terrible acts in an effort to get more money.  Rest assured, it’s not the paper or the numbers that they want, but the power and the goods that said money represents, as you will see later on.

The cure for greed and the cure for poverty are one in the same: recognize that there is more than enough to go around for everyone and find a way to satisfy everyone at the table.

It is important to note that money is not, itself, a bad thing.  It’s just a tool, like a hammer or a pencil, that facilitates a purpose.  In the case of money, that purpose is to act as a catalyst for the trade of goods and services.  Just as guns don’t kill people, neither does money create problems.  It is only people that kill people or create problems.  How can money create something?  It’s just a tool.  Only divine beings, living souls, can create anything.

Without getting into too much detail, there is a principle in law that states that the created cannot be higher than the creator.  Who is the creator in this case?  We are.

We humans are the creators of every organization and institution on this planet, and we are the creators of governments and money.  They are our tools, our creations.  They have only the power and authority and value that we say they do or that we give to them; and we alone have the ability to revoke that power, authority, and value.  Whether we choose to abdicate our role as creator and be overrun by these Frankenstein monsters or not is our choice.  But eventually, the human race will be pushed to the breaking point unless it wakes the fuck up and remembers that the power was ours all along.

Like what Glinda, the good witch, tells Dorothy at the end of the Wizard of Oz, you’ve had the power to go home all along.  It’s just that you weren’t in a position to accept or believe it, and so no one told you, but instead left you to figure it out for yourself.  Well, consider this your wake up call, with me giving you formal notice the power is yours.

“The man who has no money is poor, but one who has nothing but money is poorer.” ~ Orison Swett Marden, New Thought author

Return we now to the subject of paper money.  It’s really almost absurd how everyone knows that paper money is just worthless paper, and yet we still choose to rely on it for everything.  We covet it as though it were the secret of eternal life.  But why?  What makes paper money so valuable?

Recall that, in ancient times, people used mainly gold and silver as money in the form of bars or coins.  Bars and coins were used because they could be regulated in terms of weight and purity, but they were not without their flaws.  The most basic reason for switching to paper money was because it was lighter in weight and easier to carry around.  You could write up a certificate for really any amount of money that you wanted, so long as you had enough gold or silver somewhere to back it up.

For hundreds of years, it was the case that all certificates of this kind could be turned in any time the holder felt insecure and he would be given an amount of gold or silver equal to the amount that was written on the document.  What had value wasn’t so much the actual paper, but the confidence that it could be exchanged for something of worth.  And soon people began to trade these papers as though they were actual value.

If you look at the top of any American dollar bill, you will see the words “Federal Reserve Note” scrawled on it.  The word “note” in this case means a promissory note.  In other words, it’s a promise to pay.

If you’ve ever taken out a loan, you probably filled out a promissory note and gave it to your creditor or bank.  That promissory note is your promise to pay.  It’s your promise to them that they can redeem it for something of actual value.  With that confidence, the note can be exchanged as though it were actual currency.  They can trade it in for whatever it’s worth (which these days is just an extension of credit).

Things start to get interesting when you begin to realize that all cash is just a promissory note.  What we think of money is really just our promise that the holder will get something in return for it.

More interesting still is that, if you look at a dollar bill, it no longer says “redeemable in gold or silver.”  Prior to 1933, all dollars were promises of payment in either gold (which was standard) or silver to the holder.  So what happened in 1933?

“What difference does it make how much money you have?  What you do not have amounts to much more.” ~ Seneca

For a more in-depth history, I would recommend the documentary The Money Masters, but suffice to say that the history of America has really been one of banking and trying to avoid central banks, in particular.  The Founding Fathers resisted the Bank of England and wrote into the Constitution the power of Congress to coin money and to regulate its value.  And our country managed to survive well enough without a central bank for over a hundred years.  Since our inception, private international banks have tried to get Congress to give over that power to them and, in 1913, President Woodrow Wilson finally caved with the signing of the Federal Reserve Act.  From then on, the Federal Reserve (a private international bank) would be the sole creator of all the currency used to fund the government, which it lent to us at interest.

Prior to 1933, the United States was on a gold standard and most of its currency was backed by gold.  In 1933, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt ordered a seizure of all the gold held by private citizens in an effort to pay off the national debt.  With the signing of HJR 192 on June 5, 1933, the use of promissory notes backed by gold was ended and a new form of currency replaced it: the Federal Reserve Note.

Federal Reserve Notes (which replaced United States Notes) are what’s known as fiat currency.  Fiat means that is isn’t backed by a commodity (like gold), but has value because of government decree.  It has value because the government says it does and will force you to accept it if offered for the payment of any and all debts in the United States.

If you look in the corner of the dollar bill, it says as much.  The word “tender” in this case means “an offer of money.”  It’s an offer of money because it’s only a note, which is a promise of money, not actual money itself.  There is no money.  Roosevelt took it all from us to pay the debt, which we still have hanging over us to this very day.

Following World War I, Germany was in bankruptcy because a lot of its infrastructure was destroyed and it had no money to rebuild or to pay the war reparations that its enemies demanded as a condition for accepting German surrender.  As a result, Germany suffered massive inflation and the Deutsche Mark became incredibly devalued without anything to back it.  It is said that marks were used to wallpaper people’s houses, that’s how worthless they were.  It was only through the aid of private banks and corporations – some of them American – that the Nazis were able to rise to the levels they did, and we all know how that turned out.

Similarly, after the Great Depression, people began to hoard gold as the only valuable form of currency.  Without gold and value passing through the American economy, the government had no funds to operate with.  It couldn’t afford to maintain its military in wartime or repay the Federal Reserve and its other creditors.  So the United States was also forced to declare bankruptcy and stole all the gold of its citizens in an effort to pay off its debts.

While we may have gotten out of the Great Depression through a re-stimulating of the economy via Roosevelt’s New Deal, we continue to employ the Federal Reserve and its worthless paper.  So a rational person would have to conclude that it’s only a matter of time before we fall back into that same pit again.  Only next time, it’s liable to be a lot worse.  Remember, we brought the Fed into this world and we can certainly take it out.

Symbols, Part 1: Introduction

Posted in All, Economics, Media, Miscellaneous, Politics, Psychology with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 18, 2010 by marushiadark

“I leave symbols to the symbol-minded.” ~ George Carlin

Chances are, the first things we think of when we think of symbols are logos and religious emblems.  All major corporations have their own specific form of branding with an enigmatic logo to identify them to the public.  Religions use symbols like crosses, stars, wheels, the sun, the earth, and a whole host of others as representations of their specific beliefs.  But these aren’t the only symbols.

A symbol is anything that stands for something else.  Every letter and number is a symbol and the words they comprise are just oral or written symbols for ideas.  A kiss can be a tactile symbol of love or betrayal, depending on its context.  Your own body is just a symbol for who you are, just like your signature or your avatar on a forum.  People (or more specifically their actions) can be symbols for specific ideals or modes of thought.  Certain buildings, banners, and flags are also symbols for the same.  Money can be a symbol of status and power or of greed and corruption, and its lack can be a symbol of either suffering or enlightenment.

Really anything can be a symbol, and symbols can be symbols of other symbols, even.  We are undoubtedly creators and users of symbols, all of us.  In fact, we are the only creatures on the planet that use them, and we use them for pretty much everything.

“Most people are unwilling to seek and create their own interpretations of these symbols.  Instead, they blindly submit to preconceived definitions and connotations given by sources unknown.  Because of this, many things have been predetermined in our understanding of life without our knowledge.” ~ The Esoteric Agenda

If I were to say the word “swastika” to you, what’s the first thought that comes to your mind?  Probably a Nazi banner or something else to do with Nazis or Nazism, right?  What if I said “red, white, and blue”?  Probably the American flag, if you’re an American, or something about patriotism and government if you’re from a nation whose flag is red, white, and blue, such as England, America, France, Australia, and many others (most of them use the same colors).  If I said “cross,” your first thought would probably be a Latin cross, with or without the image of Jesus’ body hanging from it.

That right there is proof that we are fixated on symbols that have predetermined definitions and connotations, and that we allow others to dictate for us what to think.  The swastika has its origins thousands of years before the Nazis ever existed, and it was largely a symbol of peace and power.  The cross has its origins thousands of years before Christianity ever arose.  And “red, white, and blue,” are just colors – frequencies of light waves.

Symbols have no meaning except what we give them, so why are our interpretations of these symbols so specific and so limited?  The only reason our thoughts would be so restricted is through deliberate social conditioning.  Symbols and their meanings are not something genetic, but rather they are learned and culturally specific.

Does that mean that everyone whose first thought when I said “swastika” was “Nazi” is a mind-slave?  No, not really.  It does if those are the only things you thought about, but those with more knowledge and awareness will not be limited to just one interpretation of such symbols.

To illustrate the difference, one of my teachers used the example of “gum” as a symbol.  A ditsy, bubble-gum chewing, Valley Girl cheerleader with no awareness or knowledge at all might only think of chewing gum; but someone else might think of chewing gum and think of other things, like a gum tree, gum arabic, or even gummy substances.  The point is that a person who’s not a mind-slave is in full control of their mind and is actively using it to make mental connections to as many things as possible, developing a neurological web instead of a linear, one-to-one association between symbol and idea.

When a corporation, religion, or government body creates a symbol, there is next to no leeway in what they want you to think with regards to that symbol.  Corporations want you to associate their company and their product with it.  They pay millions of dollars to develop logos that will hit deep psychological nerves in your subconscious and create nuerological links between those symbols and the desire for certain products.  Religions demand your focus and devotion to their symbols, which only serves to distract you from truly experiencing life the way it was meant to be lived.  This is why God made it a sin to worship such images.  And governments want your loyalty and your obedience and to keep you distracted with these symbols of pride and patriotism while they carry out large-scale violations against our rights, most-notably war.  In the pledge of allegiance, we’re told to pay homage to the flag and that burning a flag is illegal in many places, even though the flag is just a piece of cloth to which we add our own meaning.

Such symbols are most prolifically portrayed through the media, Hollywood, and through advertisements.  Many of them are variations of the same bastardizations of more spiritually enlightening icons: the sun, the moon, the all-seeing eye, the pentagram, the hexagram, the double-square, the cross, the pyramid, the torch, the eagle, the yin-yang, vesica piscis, skull and crossbones, and so on.  These symbols are not inherently good or bad, but are only good or bad in so far as the meanings and purposes we assign to them.  Look around sometime and see just how prolific these symbols really are.

A is for Agent

Posted in All, Economics, Media, Politics, Psychology, Spirituality with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 15, 2010 by marushiadark

“The Matrix is a system, Neo.  That system is our enemy … these people are still a part of that system and that makes them our enemy.  You have to understand, most of these people are not ready to be unplugged.  And many of them are so inert, so helplessly dependent on the system that they will fight to protect it.” ~ Morpheus

When the Wachowski brothers first created The Matrix, they viewed the relationship between the humans and the machines as a metaphor for the relationship between individuals and the institutions that they created.  Many of our man-made institutions were initially created with the most noble of intentions, but I bet we can all name at least one that we’re aware of that has lost sight of its original purpose and gone on to become something far more malicious (for most people, if it’s not the Catholic Church or the opposing political party, it’s Scientology).

No creation can supersede its creator, and yet it would seem that most, if not all, of our religious and governmental and commercial institutions have grown to become quite the Frankenstein monsters and are threatening to choke the living daylights out of us.

We are the ones that created these institutions and breathed life into them.  Like anything else, they can only do what we empower them to do.  Our own Constitution, for instance, declares that the American government is meant to be a government “of the people, by the people, for the people.”  The Founding Fathers wrote the power into the hands of the people, so why is it that we, the people, are utterly incapable of stopping these machines, these now-self-aware monstrosities?

The fact of the matter is that our institutions have become sentient programs with lives and minds of their own that are struggling desperately to survive, even if it means destroying or enslaving a few minds, a few lives, in the process.  But just as the machines of The Matrix need humans for fuel, so too is the lifeblood of our modern institutions a fuel comprised of human beings.

An agent is a sentient program that does the bidding of the machines.  A sentient program is self-aware like a human being, but is different from us in that it only ever does what it is ordered or commanded or pre-programed to do.  It doesn’t think for itself.  It doesn’t act for itself.  It is merely the arm of the machine.  The word “tool” would not be inappropriate in deference to them.

Many people that would call themselves free human beings are, in fact, merely agents of the system – the system being any institution that seeks to enslave all mankind and convert us to its way of thinking.  Think about it.  A church cannot survive without members of its congregation actively recruiting new converts.  A business cannot survive without expanding its profits, even if that means using subliminal mind-control techniques (also known as advertisements) to get human beings to become agents and buy crap they don’t need.  A government most certainly can’t survive for long without the will of the people, since the people are the ones that vote the politicians out of office.

As Confucius said, the three things needed for good government are: enough food, enough arms, and the will of the people.  If you were forced to give up one of those, then arms should go first. People can still fight without arms, but will not have the will to fight if they have no food.  If you are forced to give up another thing, then it is food.  During The Long March, Mao Zedong led his army across the mountains of China.  His men were cold and starving, but they developed a fierce loyalty to him by the end of it because he was with them, encouraging them to press forward the entire time.  But without the will and support of its people, a government, or any other institution for that matter, can do nothing at all.

If we are unhappy with a particularly malevolent institution, then the way we stop it is by removing the fuel of the machine: its agents.

“The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven’t got it.” ~ George Bernard Shaw

How do we identify an agent?  Are there any tell-tale signs?  Agents come in many forms and some are more entranced than others.

One way to tell them apart is their level of denial.  The world is full of shit and hardship and anyone that tells you differently is either an enlightened master – who fully accepts the world around him and is at peace with it – or an agent.

When you come across an enlightened master, you may not realize it at first.  Are they a simple and humble and bitter old man or an outspoken, eloquent, and enthusiastic woman.  They may be cynical or happy, but if you ask them about the state of the world, they will give you the facts of the matter and are open to new ways of thinking about what they already know.  They will not judge you, but instead accept you and your beliefs and will offer to teach you and help you grow in your own way instead of forcing you or coercing you to conform to some other way against your will.

On the other hand, an agent will use defense mechanisms to try and justify their lies and avoid confronting the truth.  If you tell them the world is round, they will show you a diagram of the world as a disk that spins counterclockwise and tell you that the resultant upward force is what really causes gravity.  They will defend the lie with blissful ignorance and apologetic threats.  They are like the addict that will attempt to get you hooked on their stupidity and lies.

Use your own powers of observation.  If something appears false to you, then it very well might be.  Use your rational, analytical mind and make a case for why things are the way they are.  Any reasonably sane individual may or may not agree with your conclusions, but they should at least be open to hearing you out and consider what you have to say.  If they agree, it’ll be because of your facts and your logic, not the promises of benefits and the avoidance of punishment.  Anyone who threatens you or promises you candy if you just get in the van is not your friend.

“Are you at liberty to play for that, Sctanley?  Or would you prefer to play for smiles?” ~ Dave, Couples Retreat

In some cases, usually the more indoctrinated cases, an agent will take on a phony persona.  These people are not really people, but are mere shells of persons who are trying to get you to volunteer for slavery.  The 13th Amendment banned slavery and involuntary servitude, but voluntary servitude is still perfectly legal. If you buy into the false images of these agents, you will have committed yourself to be bound in servitude.

Such persons you can usually identify right away.  They will have big stupid grins, wide Bambi eyes, and doll-like faces.  Whenever I see someone like this, I shutter and avert my eyes because of how creepy they are.  They’re like the bottom of the uncanny valley: not really living and not really dead, but somewhere in-between.  A real-life zombie or vampire.  If you need a visual example, here’s what one looks like:

Paula Deen - Creepy, Agent

God, that woman creeps me out so much.

I’m sure you’ve seen that type of face before (especially if you watch Lie to Me).  Kitty Farmer and Jim Cunningham from Donnie Darko, the Todds from Bubble Boy, the Enzyte Guy, and Joo Dee from Avatar: The Last Airbender are all examples of this.  Many extremely devout religious practitioners, politicians, advertisers, and government and corporate spokespersons have this same face.  That same cold, lifeless stare in their eyes that says, “Everything’s fine, you’ve nothing to worry about.”  But what they really mean is “I’m a brain-washed tool.  Beware of me and my machine.”

I’m sure you can find many more examples of this face showing up.  It’s not that free people can’t be happy, just that theirs is a more genuine and less phony kind of happiness.  Their eyes are deep wells and they radiate warmth and compassion when they are happy, instead of giving off the stink of robotic emotions.

Beware of the agents of evil, for they are the true enemies of humanity and are in most need of rescuing.

The Needs of the One

Posted in All, Economics, Health, Psychology, Science with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 9, 2010 by marushiadark

“What’s necessary is never unwise.” ~ Sarek, Star Trek (2009)

Think about that phrase for a minute: what is necessary is never unwise.  The term “necessary” goes hand-in-hand with the term “need” and how often do we use the term “need” in a given day?  I need a new cell phone.  I need to be with my friends.  We need a new computer.  America needs some new leadership.  The Democrats need to wake up.  Someone needs to do something about it.  You need to pay your bills.  You need to get a job.  You need to grow up.  You need to take responsibility.  You need this and that and the other thing.  We sure are a needy group of people, aren’t we?

The term “need” implies a thing that must be done; that failure to do whatever the word is attached to will result in the destruction or non-survival of something, most often implying that that something is ourselves.  But what is actually necessary for us to survive as human beings?  Is there any way that we can prioritize what it is that we really need.

Fortunately for us, there are people who already have.

“When the chips are down, these ‘civilized’ people will eat each other.  You’ll see.  I’ll show you.” ~ The Joker

In 1943, Abraham Maslow proposed a theory that has since come to be known as Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.  It is a system of prioritizing needs that is now taught in introductory psychology classes and even basic marketing courses.  This system outlines five general levels of needs that human beings have and the priority given to them by most people, whether they are aware of it or not.  From lowest to highest, they are:

  1. Physiological Needs – The most basic needs of the body including food and water (energy), air, homeostasis, sleep, expulsion of waste, desire for sex and procreation.
  2. Safety and Security – This includes security (health) of body and mind of self, offspring, family, friends, and other perceived allies, such as coworkers.  Also including the protection of resources and tools, such as home or property, that enhance the survival of the same.
  3. Social Needs – Developing relationships, connections, and emotional attachments to others.
  4. Self-Esteem – The need to feel good about one’s self and to earn respect, dignity, and a sense of worth or value.  Feeling confidence and motivation.
  5. Self-Actualization – Maintaining principles, morals, ethics, and codes; spirituality, accepting facts and realities, and developing a sense of oneness with God and fellow man.

Despite its criticism, Maslow’s Hierarchy is a very good tool that we can use to evaluate the importance of our own needs.  We can even begin to understand the motivations and behaviors of others because the hierarchy doesn’t merely apply to the reality of a person’s needs, but also their perceptions of what they need.

For instance, I recall watching an episode of Law & Order in which the prosecutor tried a homeless man who killed another homeless man for an orange.  The court acted in accordance with the letter of the law and held the man to their standards.  But as we can see from the hierarchy, that falls under Self-Actualization, while the homeless man was trying to fulfill his more basic Physiological Needs.  Had the prosecution understood Maslow’s Hierarchy, perhaps they would have given the man something to eat instead of a jail sentence, since that’s the only reason why he did what he did and I think any of us in a similar situation would have acted exactly the same way.

“For many people, one of the most frustrating aspects of life is not being able to understand other people’s behavior.” ~ Unknown

Levels one and two of the hierarchy deal with the part of the brain known as the amygdala.  This is also called the lizard brain, which contains the primitive and instinctual survival needs as found in birds, reptiles, and small mammals.  At this level, you are willing to forgo the needs of others in order to ensure your own survival and that of your most immediate friends and family (which also eventually give way to your own survival if the need is strong enough).  Between the levels, however, a person will often take risks to their safety in order to satisfy their physiological needs.  The brain decides that it needs energy or it will die and that it’s worth the risk of a little pain and discomfort to satisfy that need.  No one puts off buying groceries to pay their mortgage (and if you do, that may be the source of your problems right there).  They might tighten their belts and cut back in some cases, but when the chips are down, food and water come before house and home and most definitely before the law.  Even corporations will set aside morals and values and deals with certain clients if they believe it could jeopardize their income, which is the lifeblood of any company.

Levels three and four of the hierarchy deal with the limbic system and neocortex of the brain.  It’s the part found in dogs, primates, dolphins, and other higher mammals.  Basic social skills come at this level (a pack mentality).  Often times, people will degrade themselves in order to be part of a group, doing things that don’t necessarily make them feel good, but that stave off that feeling of being alone.  This is the mentality of frat initiates and high school students that will suffer through ordeals to be part of the cool kids.  They may give up their principles and their own self-worth, but at least they have the backing of the group.  Many people also abandon certain religious or political ideologies that no longer resonate with them.  If there’s a law that they don’t like, they try to change it.

The final level is a level that only exists in human beings and it’s related to the aspect of the brain that is responsible for creativity, reason, and imagination.  It’s what gives us our ability to problem solve, develop technology, art, philosophy, language, symbols, and everything else that makes us distinct from animals.  It has also allowed us to become detached from the balance that nature has so carefully maintained because we have overcome any and all predators with the only possible exception being ourselves.

“If the chips are down, then you might feel a little awkward at that sense of finality and being powerless to affect the outcome.” ~ Unknown, allusion to poker

There is a bit of wiggle room within this hierarchy.  Through training, a person or animal can be made to ignore or change its basic instinct through reward-punishment and the installing of mental aberrations and false ideas into the reactive mind.  But as I said before, the hierarchy also comes into play with regards to perception of needs.  A person might choose to follow a certain religious code, for instance, because they feel it will lead to greater survival for a longer period of time in some afterlife.  A mother might choose to step into harm’s way for the safety of her offspring because of a perception that the offspring is more important than her own needs.  Mohandas Ghandi famously starved himself in an effort to quell violence that arose between Hindus and Muslims in India, but it’s reasonable to assume that even he would have asked for nourishment before finally starving to death.

Moreover, people have often been coerced and blackmailed into performing certain actions under threat of their needs not being met.  Corporations like Monsanto specifically target our food supply, pharmaceutical companies make bad drugs that negatively effect our health, and governments allow the dumping of fluoride into our water systems because they know these are basic necessities of ours and that, if we don’t do everything it takes to ensure those needs are met properly, we will become weaker and more susceptible to outside influences.  This is why it is important we make a concerted effort to ensure that the more basic needs of every human being on this planet are met and then work from there.

All in all, Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs is a useful tool in helping to prioritize our basic needs as human beings.  Things like cell phones and political leaders become less relevant in terms of our needs except in their ability to enhance our survival.

There are, of course, other lenses through which we might look at our needs and I will address some of those in my next post.